Branding Book: What are Your Brand’s Core Purpose and Values

     

Published: January 30, 2017

The first part of your branding book should serve to define and communicate what your brand’s core purpose and values are. In this post, we’re going to cover the Mission, Core Values, and Brand Promise. Each of these components should be used to help employees, customers, and the public understand why they should align themselves with your brand.

The Mission Statement

Some experts say that your mission statement should be one sentence while others suggest a longer format to include more details. We think each company should choose the size that best fits its goals with one thing in mind: the shorter the better. The mission statement needs to be something that’s quickly ingested by the reader so if you need an extra sentence or two to make your case, use them. Otherwise, save the extended narrative for another component of your branding book.

Your mission statement should tell people what you do and how you do it. It should communicate who you are serving, and what value you bring to your entire community of employees, customers, and neighbors. Everything else you define in your branding book must serve this mission.

Your Core Values

Your clients want to know that they are doing business with a company that is aligned with their values. Your employees want more than just a paycheck; they want to feel like they are part of a larger organization that is making a difference. Defining your core values will build trust and help establish real relationships with people that lead to a stronger company.

Because your core values will inform decisions made throughout your organization, it is important to get plenty of input while you’re defining them. Look to key stakeholders, top performers, and long-term clients to share what they think you stand for and compare that list to what your company founders or leaders create and work from there. 

Common words that show up in a value statement include accountability, diversity, integrity, safety, and balance. However, only you can decide what is most important for your business.

Brand Promise 

You want customers to have an expectation of service from your company, and then you must deliver an experience that meets that expectation. If people have no assumptions or anticipations about your service, then they are not motivated enough to forge a real relationship with you. A brand promise defines for the customer what the expectation should be and this will drive confidence in your brand.

To get an idea of what a brand promise should be, here are a few very recognizable promises made by national brands:

  • Geico: 15 minutes or less can save you 15% or more on car insurance.

  • BMW: The ultimate driving machine.

  • H&M: More fashion choices that are good for people, the planet and your wallet.

  • Nationwide Insurance: Nationwide is on your side.

  • McDonald’s: Provide simple, easy enjoyment to every customer at every visit.

More than just a slogan, these promises set expectations that every single customer will look forward to enjoying.

Necessary Overlap

Defining these components will lead to a bit of overlap as each piece digs into who you are as a company and how you want to be perceived by others. However, the subtle differences between each element will push you to crystallize and solidify your branding so the perceptions become unmistakable. 

Stay tuned… In our next post, we’ll get into more detail on what should make up your Value Proposition and how to use your Differentiators to rise above the noise and gain the confidence of consumers and employees.

Next Post: Branding Book: Your Value Proposition and Differentiators

Categories: Branding
Tags: Branding, Brand Book, Mission Statement, Core Values, Brand Promise,
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